Like water for the desert, New Media for New Mexico

silver city

Great Race Videos!

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These videos were shot by the kind folks at ITV.

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Go Mustangs!


Student Work Fall 2012

A sampling from 4D and Studio I. Yay idEA students!!

 

 

 

 

 


Twoey Interviews Malaria

with Nick Carter and Dr.  Jost

 


Solar Eclipse

Though we were a few hundred miles too far south the get the full 100 percent annular eclipse, with a Polarized lens filter and my Canon camera, I was able to capture these photos of the eclipse at 86% over Bill Evans Lake.


Guggenheim: John Chamberlain, American Sculptor

The main exhibit at the Guggenhiem when I visited in early March 2012 was the work of sculptor John Chamberlain (April 16, 1927 – December 21, 2011). His signature media of steel junked car parts formed the bulk of the exhibit, though I also noted a few pieces that used polyurethene foam tied together with string.

I found myself feeling alternately fascinated, annoyed, and amused by the artist and his work. Chamberlain was a noted wild man in his heyday. Getting arrested after a major exhibit for fighting with a police officer was only one of his escapades. He left studies at the School of the Art Insitute of Chicago after arguing with his professors and accusing them of being narrow minded. He insisted that he worked with no thought of its meaning, and was clearly irked by the ever-present associations of the auto industry and car crashes with his sculptures. He claimed he used junked auto parts because there was a lot of the material lying around. Perhaps my favorite story associated with his work is that several of his sculptures were carted off to the trash as they were sitting outside of a gallery, waiting to be brought in for exhibition.

All of this definitely added to Chamberlain’s allure in my mind. Irreverence is a character trait I personally admire.  On that note, I had to wonder if his foam pieces were a “screw you” kind of joke on his patrons. When I saw one at the Guggenheim, I couldn’t stifle my laughter. It seriously looked exactly like the foam mattress I had myself tied up and put in the garage. I really couldn’t see what was going on with it, other than looking like, well, a junky tied-up foam mattress. Its form was not dynamic in any way. I don’t think it was conceptual art. I think it may have just been crappy art. A joke, conceptual art, crappy art… personally I feel if the viewer finds herself tossing these terms around to describe someone’s artwork, something is likely wrong.

His steel sculptures were another story. They do indeed look like abstract impressionist paintings in 3D. Twisted, huge, hulks of color and metal, they forced me to stand up and take notice. In fact, there was so much energy in his work, I could feel it propelling me excitedly from piece to piece. Some art invites you in slowly contemplate every nuance.  Chamberlain’s sculptures made me want to circle round excitedly, jump up and down, run back and forth… which I think I did actually, probably to the consternation of the other art admirers at the museum that day. The sculptures are vibrant, colorful, full of energy, full of life.

As a welder, I did peer closely to see if I could determine how his pieces were put together. There was nothing special about the welding, but I really have no idea how he twisted the metal to meet his exact idea of what each piece should look like. At first I thought he must be just making them on the fly, but the maquettes on display proved me wrong.

I read later Chamberlain veered from the steel car-parts sculptures to foam and other media only for a shot time in the middle of his career, and then went back to the car parts.  I opine that this was a good decision, for the energy, color, and form of the sculptures made from this signature media are unique and arresting.


iDEA Exhibit in NY: Logistics & Lessons Learned


Putting on an exhibit of WNMU student work in New York City was just fabulous, and our experience was undoubtedly a total success.  We were two students (Anna Davis and moi) and a faculty adviser (Peter Bill) in New York for a week, during Spring Break 2012. The exhibit was the heart of the trip, though we also had a serious agenda of attending museums and galleries.

I’d been to Manhattan before, and to some of its museums, but having my own work shown during our stay there changed the tenor of our visit. We weren’t just observing and taking notes as diligent art students. We were participating in the very pulse of the art scene, adding our own lifeblood, changing the color and sounds of the city for anyone who saw our work.  And when I walked in to galleries, festivals, and museums as the trip progressed, I held my head a bit higher, and I felt like I could meet this city and any artist in it eye to eye. That was an amazing feeling.

Our preparation for the trip was crucial, and everything we did paid off. Midterms very not conveniently were right before our trip, and as we neared our final day of class, I was practically living in the lab and felt like I was close to losing my grip. So, Lesson 1: set deadlines, in stone, far away from exams. Still, we were pretty organized. I had set up a spreadsheet on Google Docs, and we had a schedule for each day of the trip, including setup and breakdown of the exhibit. We tested all our equipment beforehand. The rear-projection screen (Anna’s wax paper innovation) worked. The DVD player worked. The projector worked. The RCA cables worked. Our DVD looped properly. Remotes and extension cords were packed. We were ready.

However, as much as we tested everything beforehand, there were still aspects of the exhibit left, somewhat, to chance. We could only bring what we could fit in a large suitcase ($25 charge, thank you very much US Airways), and there were items that we would need to get on location. This worried me. I lost sleep thinking about what could go wrong. What if our bag was held up at the airport? What if we couldn’t hang our 9’ x 7’ screen from the ceiling or walls of the gallery? And on and on. We had pored over specs at length of our space, but… it was hard to believe it would all work out.

As it turned out, everything was fine. We arrived early to the Phoenix airport, giving security plenty of time to ponder our plethora of electronics. Once in New York, we bought a dowel for the screen at a hardware store near the exhibit space, and with a little duct tape, wire, and troubleshooting the sound system, we were set up in about two hours. When I stood outside our finished window display, watching the passersby slow down and taking in our student work, I felt like I had a burst of energy that went right to my ambition and my pride. Which, as an artist, can be a hard feeling to come by.

We pulled off the first WNMU exhibit in New York, and that is no small thing. Anna and I sat talking in the dark gallery space after we broke it down, and we both realized, we could do this again. We could do it in New York or anywhere, we could do solo exhibits, we could do group exhibits, installations, interactive media. What can I say? We did it, we did it, we did it! Of all the experiences I have had as an art student, this really has had the most impact on what I know I can accomplish.

Elizabeth (BJ) Allen


My Proposal to the Mural Painting Class

Some crazy play with perspective in the pit behind the FACT…in the spirit of these pieces…


Nostophobia @ McCray Gallery

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Daughters, sixteen, travel, river…to the river, boy, tails…fish-mermen!, whispers, make love, return, twelve days – no! – months, giving birth, babies, lullaby, anxious, sons, the first…

Full moon, travel to the river, sons, flow, cry, fathers, cry, and cry, and whispering, weeping, next-full moon, weeping, sons mothers, washing the hair, smell, mother, weeping, next full moon, repeat…


animated giffiness

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from

http://stereo.nypl.org


Are the iDEA students sane..or insane??? *evil chuckle*

A collaboration between the iDEA 4D class and the Sociology department led to the creation of one of the more involved shoots of the semester.  The craziness began when Prof. Peter Bill was approached by Noel Shearer, a psychology student at WNMU, about making a film for one of her class projects based on David Rosenham’s article “On Being Sane in Insane Places”, detailing a study in which sane people managed to get admitted to mental institutions and then details the problems they had  getting discharged.  Can sane people really be that different from insane people?  The concept intrigued Robert Torres and Anna Davis, and a script was written and the students in the 4D class cast as various characters.  Permission was obtained to film in the abandoned Ft. Bayard Hospital, a creepy locale if there ever was one.  The entire class had a fun time getting into character-maybe a little too much fun? As a class we learned about the details involved in a larger shoot, as well as some of the issues that arise as more people get involved in a project.  This project was also a great collaboration between different departments at WNMU and the Silver City community. This film also illustrated the fact that digital media can have a broad application for many fields.. such as making a dry intellectual paper into a fun film! And Sociology class presentations do not have to be boring. Noel got an A, and hopefully our iDEA students are no more crazy then usual…


stuxnet- you will know this name, sooner or later

stuxnet is a computer virus, probably created by some combo of NSA/CIA/Mossad, that shut down the iranian nuclear complex last year-
so far “yeah!”  the problem of course is that it is the first “real” (as in causing of physical damage) virus- both russia and china, and now iran have significant “cyberwar” capabilities- so look for stuxnet II, hitting an ATM/powerplant/traffic control system near you!

all of this points to the fact that we need to have back ups to our data on the cloud, alternatives to cell phones/internet devices dependent on the internet, and remember as we use computers every day, they can be used against us. (did anyone learn anything from the cell phone/EMT outage last winter in silver?)

excellent typography by the way- looks largely done in AE using 3-d, and 3-d elements.

An infographic dissecting the nature and ramifications of Stuxnet, the first weapon made entirely out of code. This was produced for Australian TV program HungryBeast on Australia’s ABC1

Direction and Motion Graphics: Patrick Clair http://www.patrickclair.com
Written by: Scott Mitchell

Production Company: Zapruder’s Other Films.


Join Mother-Daughter Artist Guild

A newly formed artist guild is soliciting members! If art runs in your family, give it a look!!  Members can live anywhere, not just Grant County and Silver City, where the group has begun. All members will have a biography on the website, and there are several upcoming events already planned.

http://motherdaughterartistguild.org/


chocolat fantasia in the SC

jaime continues his citizen journalism…


filming DOWNTOWN tomorrow!

Help Silver City win the Great American Main Street Award and become a YouTube celebrity!

As part of our finalist’s application for this prestigious national award, Silver City MainStreet will be filming a group sing of the final line of the 1964 Petula Clark song Downtown. The idea is to have hundreds of people gathered on Broadway under the Downtown Gateway Arch representing our entire community.

Since Western is such an important part of Silver City, we’d like to extend a special invitation to the WNMU community to join us for this memorable event. Come dressed as you are, or wear your purple and gold to represent your school to the rest of the world!

Filming will take place on Broadway between Bullard and Hudson Streets this Tuesday, Feb. 1 from 8:30 to 9 am. Please join us, and bring your friends! For more information, visit www.silvercitymainstreet.com , or call (575) 534-1700.