Like water for the desert, New Media for New Mexico

Latest

POPUP a New Media Festival 2/18-19

new media

PoP uP a new media festival

Pop New Media Festival
Hosted by New Media iDEAlab, MRAC, WILL, and WNMU
2/18-19

Keynote Lecture:
Shadowpeople
Cannon Hersey
2/18 6:30 PM Parotti Hall
Main campus WNMU
Cannon Hersey is a photographer, fine artist and organizer of large-scale cultural efforts in non-traditional spaces in New York City, Sao Paulo and Johannesburg. He is committed to connecting art and the public in unique and unexpected ways to explore the meaning of race, religion, culture and commerce in the modern global world.

Everything Wearable Technology Demo/workshop
2/19 4pm  McCray 118
Cost $50 for circuitboard/lights/you will take
something lighted and wearable home.

New Media Performance:
2/19 8 pm Parotti Hall
Featuring work, performances and improv by: Barry Moon, Dawn Chambers, Doug Nottingham, Jessica Rajko, Kate Brown, Vance Galloway, Zoe Wolf,  Peter Bill, WNMU students and others!

Film 1: Nanook of The North

This was the first look into the Inuit world.  It essentially was the first documentary made.  In the early 1900’s Robert J. Flaherty went on an expedition to the Canadian Arctic by the Hudson Bay.  During his time spent with the Inuit people (whom he referred to as Eskimos) he documented the experience with a Bell-Howell Camera and a portable developing and printing machine.  During expeditions between 1910 and 1913 Flaherty compiled enough footage to put together a short film.  The film burned and Flaherty decided to go back with a film crew and recapture what he had lost of raw footage.  1914 through 1916 Nanook was created.  I say created instead of filmed to make the differentiation between the earlier raw film and the product of direction that was the footage used in the final cuts.

Source: Film 1: Nanook of The North

Border Art

I wrote an article for Desert exposure. It was a punchy little piece, but obscure editing decisions, and sloppy layout rendered it somewhat illegible. Here is a corrected version, please read this one!

desert-exposure-article

We have been getting lots of good press lately!

Much thanks for everyone who participated and helped!

This is for the JuarezX show, with interview of Sarita Cordelero (translated by the ever awesome Dr. Lydia Huerta):

juarezX-press2

This is for Landscape of the Gila, and the Gila Time-lapse Film Festival. Interviews of Casey Kiernan, Stephen Dirkes, Godfrey Reggio, Christin Necker, Victor Masayesva, and petit moi. I spent AGES agonizing over the art for the Gila River Fest poster, and then at the last minue, came up with the hand image for the cover of Desert Exposure…
So much thanks to Allyson Siwik, and Donna Stevens who work SO hard every year to make this happen.

gila-river-press!

Rose B Simpson Lecture

Rose B Simpson lecture complete from peter bill on Vimeo.

WNMU Cultural Affairs, Expressive Arts dept, MRAC, and WILL present
The Edwina and Charles Milner
Women in the Arts Lecture Series
with inaugural lecture by
Rose B Simpson

The Gila River Festival Art Show, 9/25/15

Phoebe has written an excellent review of the Landscape of the Gila show:

“Ripples” – by Penny Flick, encaustic

The first thing that caught my attention was the color of this piece. It’s a very appealing blend of greens and blues and browns. I think the addition of the two sets of angled, parallel lines of contrasting colors enhances the overall design and effect of the work.

I’ve not seen many encaustics, so found this work unique on that basis alone. The waxen texture and three-dimensionality are marvelous. I also like how the waxy medium/encaustic continues onto the four edges of the stretched canvas.

I don’t know enough about encaustics to critique the craftsmanship and technique of this piece, but it certainly looked superb to me. I think the work would inspire other artists to try this medium; there would seem to be limitless potential in it. Plus it simply looks like great fun.

 

Source: The Gila River Festival Art Show, 9/25/15

The contested landscape of New Mexico

This is a current that runs through much of my work- you need to go to these fraught landscapes, where people’s histories clash, and talk and try and understand the granularity of the violence that marks every square inch of North America, Europe and Asia…

Race and history in New Mexico are contested in a way unique to the United States. This has to do with discrete historical events that took place in the Land of Enchantment and the layers of conquest the state deals with today. What you had in 16th century New Mexico was a lot of small, semi-sedentary tribes (the Puebloan peoples) with some larger, raiding tribes on the edges like the some of the Apache groups and the Navajo. When the Spanish sought to expand their control north of the central Mexican silver regions, they followed the same basic trail that indigenous people used in their trading networks, going up the Rio Grande and originally establishing a capital at what the Spanish would later term San Juan Pueblo (unlike the other Pueblos, the people of San Juan have reclaimed their indigenous name and now are referred to as Ohkay Owingeh. This just happened in the last few years). The Spanish were led by Juan de Oñate, a would be next-Cortes or Pizarro who hoped to find gold and silver farther north. When Oñate arrived in New Mexico, he kicked the Ohkay Owingeh out of their homes, expected the native peoples to feed and house and work for them, and basically treated them like conquered people. When they resisted, he responded harshly, particularly at Acoma Pueblo. On a mesa west of modern-day Albuquerque, the Acoma had a great natural defense and thus took a major toll on the Spanish forces. But the Spanish eventually conquered Acoma. Several hundred Acoma were killed. More notoriously, Oñate ordered a foot cut off of all men over the age of 25 to show Spanish resolve, although only 24 actually received this punishment. The Acoma were sent into slavery, although they eventually returned and the pueblo exists today.

From the excellent blog Lawyers, Guns, and Money: http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2015/09/race-and-history-in-new-mexico

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 953 other followers