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Tutorial: Paper IQ Lamp

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River, voice, time

Godfrey Reggio, when he gave the keynote lecture for the Gila River Time-lapse Film Festival a couple of years ago (First Time-lapse film festival in North America!), talked about what a keynote is, namely the musical note that binds a piece of music together. Perhaps in the same manner, a work of art can be that keynote, that pulls together a sense of place and distills it so it may be apprehended by an observer if not in its totality of resolution and complexity, yet in a manner that at least points the way to these deep passes, shaded gullies, minnows, spiders, muck, and the rocks between your toes that is an experience of the Gila River.

We have been working some time on this, the planning stretching back a couple of years. In its current iteration, River Voice Time consists of 2 parts:
a claycrete Oja vessel, that contains projections on mist, fragrant distillations of river herbs and clay, and the stories of *you* our friends who have taken on the voice of the river, to embody it and give it concrete power that is human will;
and a CNC cut table with a projected history of the geographic quadrant that eventually contains the Gila river watershed region going back 4 Billions years in time.

Projecting onto mist, with river perfumes to embed the experience in  memory

Digging in the river to collect the clay really connected us to the land the river carves through. That slippery clay that slicks your tires on a dirt road after a rain is great building material.

Fabbing the claycreate Oja, with Kate Brown Mibreño clay activist and animator

We had been working and collaborating in our three corners of the country (NYC, Seattle and the Mimbres)- getting together for a couple of weeks in Santa Fe was absolutely key, and we thank SFAI for hosting us as part of their water rights residency.

Creating Olfactory experiences with master perfumer Stephen Dirkes

The other half of our installation is our terrain map table. I have been researching the manner in which to use a CNC machine, essentially a big router on a robot arm you can use to carve and cut pieces of wood, metal, and plastic. Suffice to say there are 15 different ways using 25 different 3d apps that can possibly do this. Finally I was able to get a cut at Make Santa Fe, with the fantastic help of Zane and Stefan at Make Santa Fe, Catherine at Extraordinary Structures, and Jeff Boyd, GIS specialist. (blog post to come as to my particular recipe for achieving our terrain map)

Cutting Topography of the Gila Watershed with übergeek and New Media guru Peter Bill

Finally, we had been working on content to project on the table, and Kate created our stunning animations to bring the history to life.

Kate Brown speed drafts-woman creates Calderesque animations.

This project had the help of many good people! The Hotsprings Ranch for hosting us, SFAI for sponsoring our residency, and The Gila Conservation Coalition for making this all happen, among many others. I would like to thank my Collaborators, Allyson Siwik, Kate Brown, and Stephen Dirkes for being so inspiring and awesome and such hard workers that they inspired this laggard to actually get some things done. The Gila is worth all of the hard work we put towards keeping it free, just as our spirits are free. However there are many deep interests in Grant Co and New Mexico that just want that water, and with our future of climate change, this fight to keep the wildness alive will not end in our lifetimes, nor those of our children.

River Voice Time will be open starting September 21st as part of the Gila River Festival

After that who knows?

Woodstock and Gimme Shelter

Good post on films we have been watching this semester in Documentary film, by Grad student Jennie Joy:

If Woodstock was the Apex of the Hippie movement, then Gimme Shelter was the Antithesis. For Woodstock it was 3 days of Peace, Love, & Understanding (and drugs & music) set in the laid back and beautiful NY countryside. The dream bubble so many youth had been riding, was popped one December night at Altamont Raceway in Livermore, California. Four months after Woodstock came Altamont, and the two couldn’t be more different. Some say that fateful night at Altamont was the loss of innocence for a generation, the final days of 1969 segued into a darker time, it was as if the hopes, dreams and philosophies of that generation died with Meredith Hunter.

Source: Woodstock and Gimme Shelter

POPUP a New Media Festival 2/18-19

new media

PoP uP a new media festival

Pop New Media Festival
Hosted by New Media iDEAlab, MRAC, WILL, and WNMU
2/18-19

Keynote Lecture:
Shadowpeople
Cannon Hersey
2/18 6:30 PM Parotti Hall
Main campus WNMU
Cannon Hersey is a photographer, fine artist and organizer of large-scale cultural efforts in non-traditional spaces in New York City, Sao Paulo and Johannesburg. He is committed to connecting art and the public in unique and unexpected ways to explore the meaning of race, religion, culture and commerce in the modern global world.

Everything Wearable Technology Demo/workshop
2/19 4pm  McCray 118
Cost $50 for circuitboard/lights/you will take
something lighted and wearable home.

New Media Performance:
2/19 8 pm Parotti Hall
Featuring work, performances and improv by: Barry Moon, Dawn Chambers, Doug Nottingham, Jessica Rajko, Kate Brown, Vance Galloway, Zoe Wolf,  Peter Bill, WNMU students and others!

Film 1: Nanook of The North

This was the first look into the Inuit world.  It essentially was the first documentary made.  In the early 1900’s Robert J. Flaherty went on an expedition to the Canadian Arctic by the Hudson Bay.  During his time spent with the Inuit people (whom he referred to as Eskimos) he documented the experience with a Bell-Howell Camera and a portable developing and printing machine.  During expeditions between 1910 and 1913 Flaherty compiled enough footage to put together a short film.  The film burned and Flaherty decided to go back with a film crew and recapture what he had lost of raw footage.  1914 through 1916 Nanook was created.  I say created instead of filmed to make the differentiation between the earlier raw film and the product of direction that was the footage used in the final cuts.

Source: Film 1: Nanook of The North

Border Art

I wrote an article for Desert exposure. It was a punchy little piece, but obscure editing decisions, and sloppy layout rendered it somewhat illegible. Here is a corrected version, please read this one!

desert-exposure-article

We have been getting lots of good press lately!

Much thanks for everyone who participated and helped!

This is for the JuarezX show, with interview of Sarita Cordelero (translated by the ever awesome Dr. Lydia Huerta):

juarezX-press2

This is for Landscape of the Gila, and the Gila Time-lapse Film Festival. Interviews of Casey Kiernan, Stephen Dirkes, Godfrey Reggio, Christin Necker, Victor Masayesva, and petit moi. I spent AGES agonizing over the art for the Gila River Fest poster, and then at the last minue, came up with the hand image for the cover of Desert Exposure…
So much thanks to Allyson Siwik, and Donna Stevens who work SO hard every year to make this happen.

gila-river-press!

Rose B Simpson Lecture

Rose B Simpson lecture complete from peter bill on Vimeo.

WNMU Cultural Affairs, Expressive Arts dept, MRAC, and WILL present
The Edwina and Charles Milner
Women in the Arts Lecture Series
with inaugural lecture by
Rose B Simpson

The Gila River Festival Art Show, 9/25/15

Phoebe has written an excellent review of the Landscape of the Gila show:

“Ripples” – by Penny Flick, encaustic

The first thing that caught my attention was the color of this piece. It’s a very appealing blend of greens and blues and browns. I think the addition of the two sets of angled, parallel lines of contrasting colors enhances the overall design and effect of the work.

I’ve not seen many encaustics, so found this work unique on that basis alone. The waxen texture and three-dimensionality are marvelous. I also like how the waxy medium/encaustic continues onto the four edges of the stretched canvas.

I don’t know enough about encaustics to critique the craftsmanship and technique of this piece, but it certainly looked superb to me. I think the work would inspire other artists to try this medium; there would seem to be limitless potential in it. Plus it simply looks like great fun.

 

Source: The Gila River Festival Art Show, 9/25/15

The contested landscape of New Mexico

This is a current that runs through much of my work- you need to go to these fraught landscapes, where people’s histories clash, and talk and try and understand the granularity of the violence that marks every square inch of North America, Europe and Asia…

Race and history in New Mexico are contested in a way unique to the United States. This has to do with discrete historical events that took place in the Land of Enchantment and the layers of conquest the state deals with today. What you had in 16th century New Mexico was a lot of small, semi-sedentary tribes (the Puebloan peoples) with some larger, raiding tribes on the edges like the some of the Apache groups and the Navajo. When the Spanish sought to expand their control north of the central Mexican silver regions, they followed the same basic trail that indigenous people used in their trading networks, going up the Rio Grande and originally establishing a capital at what the Spanish would later term San Juan Pueblo (unlike the other Pueblos, the people of San Juan have reclaimed their indigenous name and now are referred to as Ohkay Owingeh. This just happened in the last few years). The Spanish were led by Juan de Oñate, a would be next-Cortes or Pizarro who hoped to find gold and silver farther north. When Oñate arrived in New Mexico, he kicked the Ohkay Owingeh out of their homes, expected the native peoples to feed and house and work for them, and basically treated them like conquered people. When they resisted, he responded harshly, particularly at Acoma Pueblo. On a mesa west of modern-day Albuquerque, the Acoma had a great natural defense and thus took a major toll on the Spanish forces. But the Spanish eventually conquered Acoma. Several hundred Acoma were killed. More notoriously, Oñate ordered a foot cut off of all men over the age of 25 to show Spanish resolve, although only 24 actually received this punishment. The Acoma were sent into slavery, although they eventually returned and the pueblo exists today.

From the excellent blog Lawyers, Guns, and Money: http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2015/09/race-and-history-in-new-mexico

Tarkovksy films available for free on-line

I would put Tarkovsky up there with Kubrik fighting for the title of “greatest director of the 20th Century,”

Andrei Tarkovsky (1932-1986) firmly positioned himself as the finest Soviet director of the post-War period. But his influence extended well beyond the Soviet Union.  The Cahiers du cinéma consistently ranked his films on their top ten annual lists. Ingmar Bergman went so far as to say, “Tarkovsky for me is the greatest [director], the one who invented a new language, true to the nature of film, as it captures life as a reflection, life as a dream.” And Akira Kurosawa acknowledged his influence too, adding, “I love all of Tarkovsky’s films. I love his personality and all his works. Every cut from his films is a marvelous image in itself.”

Of course Bergman and Kurusawa, along with several significant others, belong up there too. But Kubrik represents the best American cinema could produce, as does Tarkovksy for the Soviets.  So how about an epic rap battle between the two at least. And watch some of these films!

(hat tip Phillip Turek) (and so let us not forget Milos Forman as well!)

http://www.openculture.com/2010/07/tarkovksy.html

WNMU New Media Grad Junchen Huang already plugging into Manhattan art scene

Well Junchen Huang has not wasted a breath on arriving in the big city. The day after he arrived he was brunching in little Italy, and plotting guerrilla projections around town. This week brings the fruits of his labors working with the SHADOWPEOPLEPROJECT.ORG, taking footage he shot last March in Hiroshima through a trip organized through WNMU’s Expressive Arts professor of New Media Peter Bill, and projecting it at Chashama.org‘s famous Anita’s Way at the heart of Times Square.  These art projects have been put together by an international arts organization led by Taku Nishimae.  Cannon Hersey, a New York City based artist has been instrumental in connecting the dots on this project.

shadowPC

“Shadow People Project” commemorates the 70th anniversary since the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Shadow People Project will present video works by established artists and youth on August 6th at 6pm at Anita’s Way (137 West 42nd Street) in Times Square, New York.

原爆投下70年を期して、NYのど真ん中で、世界のアーティストと若者が集い、平和への祈りと未来への希望を創るイベント行います。アメリカ、日本、カナダ、メキシコ、イギリス、南アフリカのアーティスト集団で、被爆者へのオマージュを捧げ、その記憶を未来へつないでいくプロジェクト=Shadow People Projectを始めました。

来る8月6日午後6時よりアートと音楽、映像プロジェクションのイベントを行い、市民への呼びかけも行います。

cannonjenson

image by Cannon Hersey and video and remix by Junchen Huang

Solo artworks by Cannon Hersey, grandson of John Hersey (author of Hiroshima) and originator of Shadow People Project, will also be on display. These artworks were created earlier this year in Hiroshima and exhibited at Komachi Art Place, Hiroshima, Japan; Red Rock Historical Society, New York, USA; and Larva, Guadalajara, Mexico. Projections include the US Premier of clips from the feature documentary film “Hiroshima Revealed” broadcast on NHK in Japan on August 4th and 5th which depicts artist Cannon Hersey following the path of his grandfather John Hersey’s depiction of 6 survivors of the atomic bomb of Hiroshima.

tcannon

Installation shot from Cannon Hersey’s recent exhibition of work made in Hiroshima in Guadalajara, Mexico through the support of the cultural department of the City of Guadalajara.

Shadow People Project will feature video remixes by Peter Bill, Junchen Huang and Tomoya Sasaki of shadow art submitted by the public to www.shadowpeopleproject.org and featured artworks by Gregory Clark, Stephanie Rose, Giles Clarke, Michelle Inotherworld and Samson Mnisi. Artworks and video made by international youth through the Shadow People Project workshop will also be on display.

Shadow People Cd Juarez: Resizte Berlin Wall from peter bill on Vimeo.

This event is made possible through the generous support of the Rolin Foundation, Tanimoto Peace Foundation, Chashama, Zengo, Katsu New York, Mayor of Nishiwaki, Maruman, Inc and Watanabe Family.

Together, we stand united as Shadow People to commemorate the survivors of the atomic bomb and to recognize those shadow people in each community around the world, and to encourage them to rise out of the shadows.

video art work by Shadow People Project workshop participants Kimiko Oku, Ran Katashima, Ruri Matsuoka, Alexis Mena, Jun Chen Huang and Andrew Clark  in Hiroshima, March/April 2015.

Shadow People Project was built by Taku Nishimae, Steve Leeper, Rebecca Irby and Cannon Hersey and the community of participants, patrons and public that believe in a new way.

Join us and send us your shadow- (www.shadowpeopleproject.org).

Media Inquiries:

  1. David Carley: +1-212-515-1903; +1-516-455-7220; DCarley@ASBSLLC.COM

日米、カナダ、中国の若者とともに行ったArt Workshop for Peaceのメンバーも参加、NYの若者たちとの交流の場ともなります。

場所はTimes Squareにほど近いAnita’s Way。ニューヨークでも有数のパブリックスペースで、42丁目のから43丁目にわたる1ブロックの長さの吹き抜け空間はステージ、照明、大型プロジェクターを備え、数々の文化的イベントが行われてきました。

国境を超えてヒロシマナガサキへの思いを伝え、核の問題を考える切っ掛けとなる画期的なイベントなります。

是非お越しください!

8月10日には秋葉元市長が中心に行っている広島−長崎平和チャリティコンサートを生ストリーミング中継してNYと広島の若者のInteractionを行います。

宜しくお願い致します!

Contact

西前 拓  917-450-4921  taku@zengo.com          takunishimae@gmail.com

WNMU/Shadowpeopleproject.org in El Paso!

First Friday’s El Paso is a great art party, at 501 Texas.  They do this every first Friday, in the 6 warm months of the year. Professor Peter Bill and New Media students set up animated projections and represented for Silver City and WNMU down in Texas. Next time, come on down!

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Japan

Recently a student of ours travelled to Japan, this is his story:

Cool way to get your photos out, and do something cool too!

Lets do some shadows people!! I am friends with these folks:

Shadow People Project was inspired by the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, where thousands of people were blown away, leaving only their shadows printed by heat on streets, bridges, walls, and granite steps. These shadow people were the first to be rendered faceless and nameless by a nuclear weapon, but they were neither the first nor the last people rendered shadows by a great power.

 

The Shadow People Project is designed to bring shadow people out of the shadows, to fill the dark night with millions of tiny stars to let the world know we are HERE and care about what’s happening to us, to each other, and to our planet. 

 

We strive to connect people by building a community that not only follows the Shadow People Project, but also inspires them to create their own social movements towards a better world. 

http://www.shadowpeopleproject.org/

Logo Design Contest

Neato contest- with prizes!

Logo Contest!

*** Over $250 in prizes ***

Nuevos Comienzos (New Beginnings) is a new commercial kitchen at The Commons, and a project of The Volunteer Center; our vision is to build a healthy and viable food economy in Grant County through mentorship of potential food entrepreneurs, while creating sustainable local businesses.

 

We need a logo that shouts “KITCHEN!,” one that we can use on letterheads, posters, hats, t-shirts, doggie sweaters, mouse pads, and more.

 

General Guidelines:

  • Open to everyone! Really. Everyone.
  • Must look good, large or small, because we’d like to use it on EVERYTHING!
  • Official rules – email barb@tvcgrantcounty.org (subject line: Logo), or stop by The Commons, 501 E 13th St (on the corner of 13th and Corbin) for rules and release forms.

How to Submit Your Design:

  • Email barb@tvcgrantcounty.org (subject line: Logo) before 11:59 PM, or
  • Drop off at The Commons, 501 E 13th St (on the corner of 13th and Corbin) before 4PM on February 4, 2015. Please remember to include your contact information and applicable waivers for your submission to be considered.

***************

Winner will be notified by February 11, 2015; prize will be awarded by February 14.

*********

More questions? Email Barb (subject line: Logo) at barb@tvcgrantcounty.org, call her at 575.388.2988 or stop by The Commons.

Deadline is February 4!

POPUP: new media mini festival

POPUP- new media mini festival from peter bill on Vimeo.

POP-UP
New Media mini festival

like water for the desert
new media for New Mexico

Hosted on the campus of WNMU in Parotti Hall

Thursday February 19th
6-7:30 PM

Discussion:
Electronic Literature
sandy baldwin- WVU

New Media Acoustics:
bruce bennett-SFSU
barry moon- ASU
doug nottingham-

Interaction Design
jessica rajko- ASU

Moderated by peter bill WNMU

Friday February 20th
7-9PM

Performance
jessica rajko
topography

sandy baldwin
Literary Spam: performance writing in video games

bruce bennett peter bill
Key:MacroMicro (Stretch)

barry moon doug nottingham
pincushioned:
in2
elastic guitar
snare alchemy 2.0
bud pets

First Light on the Oxberry Project

Kate Brown, a multimedia artist and key figure in the new Mimbreno visual arts movement, has been working to get physical, as opposed to digital, animation back up and running here in SW New Mexico.  A key part of this is her Oxberry, an animation stand from the Disney era, used for title design and cel based animation from the 1950’s… She drove this beast of an animation stand all the way back from Rhode Island to install it in her studio at the Hot Springs Ranch in Mimbres, NM.

Kate has been working to create the multiplane, which are series of glass plates, that when photographed from above allow for depth and 3d to be introduced into 2d animations.  Working with several local builders,  this process has begun.

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The WNMU New Media Studio, as part of its visiting artist series, is inviting new media artists to visit campus and work with students to create new works.  The first artist to visit this year is Stephen Dirkes, a NYC film maker and stop motion animation specialist.  We had the students collect flora from around the ranch, as we timelapsed, now we get to play:

Mimbres Hot Spring Lapse 2014 from stephen dirkes on Vimeo.

Good advice for all artists, young or otherwise…

Screen Shot 2014-11-05 at 9.49.18 AM

3. I’ve cobbled together many different streams of income, so that if the bottom falls out of one industry, I’m not ruined. My mom worked in packaging design. When computers fundamentally changed the field, she lost all her work. I learned from this.

Molly Crabapple at bOINGbOING: http://boingboing.net/2014/11/04/molly-crabapples-rules-for-c.html