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EFF is Expanding into Student and Community Organizing, and We Need Your Help

Recent events have shown us more than ever that the technologies we use and create every day have astonishing implications on our basic, most cherished rights. Tens of thousands more people have joined us in the past year alone—together, we’re building a movement. But we need your help.

Today, we at EFF are unveiling new tools for student and community activists to engage in campaigns to defend our digital rights.

We want you to bring the fight to protect online civil liberties to cities, towns, and campuses across the country. We invite you—whether you’re a newly minted activist or an experienced community organizer—to join our growing team of driven individuals and organizations actively working make sure that our rights are not left behind as we develop and adopt new technologies.

Interested? Join our mailing list for organizers today and check out our helpful resources.

I’m in. How can I help?

There are plenty of ways to take part, no matter how much organizing experience you have.

  • Start a group: Talk to friends and community members to gauge who else in your network is interested in digital freedom. Form a group that can discuss the issues and plan ways of advocating for your rights. For some tips on getting started, check out our guide on how to build a coalition on campus and in your community.
  • Bring digital rights to an existing group: These issues are everybody’s issues, no matter where on the political spectrum you lie. You can work with existing political, civil liberties, activist, and computer-related groups and urge members to take on a digital rights campaign.
  • Organize an event: We have plenty of suggestions for events you can throw, from film screenings to rallies, parties to speaker series.
  • Let your voice be heard: We are all part of the digital rights movement together, and your voice is as important as ours. Learn how to coordinate with local and national campaigns, and amplify your message by reading our tips on engaging with the press.

While many student groups and local community organizations are working on surveillance reform in light of the recent disclosures about massive government spying, it’s not only the NSA that we’re fighting: we’re demanding open access to publicly funded research; we’re fighting to protect the future of innovation from patent trolls; we’re urging companies and institutions to deploy encryption; we’re defending the rights of coders and protecting the free speech rights of bloggers worldwide—the list goes on.

We can’t do this by ourselves. That’s why we’re building a trusted team of activists and organizers across the country to spread the word and build momentum for political reform and technical tools to protect our rights.

Road trip!

EFF is also hitting the road. We’re traveling to cities and towns across the country to speak to student groups, meet with community organizers, and host local events to share and broaden our vision of an Internet grounded in creativity, community, and civil rights. In March and April, we’re visiting Boston, Cambridge, New York City, Ames, Des Moines, Washington, D.C., New Haven, and Middletown.

If you’re interested in having someone from EFF come to your event, class, or campus or community group to speak and help you all organize, send an email to april@eff.org and join our community organizers mailing list. Let us know what you’re up to, and we’ll let you know when we’re in your area.

Campus activism: All the cool people are doing it

Many activists, lawyers, and technologists will tell you that they got their start as a student. That’s why we’re especially excited to work with students and professors.

You don’t have to be a lawyer or have a college degree to be a strong voice. There’s no prerequisite for setting up a meeting with your elected official, writing an op-ed, or growing a campus organization. All it takes is a vision for change. We’ve seen student activists and innovators drive reform by challenging poorly written policies and developing new technologies that bring us closer to our vision of a networked world that respects our rights and fosters creativity.

Not a student? No worries! If you’re a member of a community that wants to engage deeper in EFF’s work, you can still join our organizers mailing list. There’s so much to do on the community level, too. If you’re concerned about local law enforcement surveillance hubs, the use of license plate readers, domestic drones, or are in a community of artists stifled by oppressive copyright policies, now is the time to raise awareness, build a coalition, and organize to defend our digital rights.

This is only the beginning. When we finally see meaningful reform of our broken intellectual property system and new bills passed that bring our national security programs back within the bounds of the Constitution—and we will—it won’t be due to the effort of a few policy wonks and privacy enthusiasts or a handful of lawyers in Washington, D.C. It will be because millions of people across the world fought for change, demanded meaningful reform, started using privacy enhancing technology, and held their elected officials accountable. Together, we’re going to make history

We hope to see you digital rights activists out there. Stay tuned. This is going to be huge.

Cinematic Poetry

Maria Popova at Brain Pickings writes:

From my friends at PBS Digital Studios and filmmaker James W. Griffithscomes A Solitary World — a breathtaking homage to H.G. Wells, with text adapted from five of his most celebrated works: The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896), The First Men in the Moon (1901), In The Days of the Comet (1906), The World Set Free (1914). Read by Terry Burns and featuring an appropriately haunting score from the young British composer Lennert Busch, the film belongs to — pioneers, perhaps — an emerging creative genre: the cinematic poem.

http://youtu.be/yWJKLYcypz8

This, frankly is what I am interested in.  The issues that arise with technology can be little virtual rabbit holes. Sometimes we must emerge, take our techno musings and deal with one of the large issues that face us: why, when technology has advanced so far from the Greeks, has our emotional evolution not kept pace?

An interesting take on the state of play in the Art world/biz/industrial complex

By a NYT art critic who is frankly part of the problem…

Money — the grotesque amounts spent, the inequitable distribution — has dominated talk about art in the 21st century so far. It’s a basic fact of art history. Emperors, popes and robber barons set the model for the billionaire buyers of today. Of course, it is today that matters to the thousands of artists who live and work in this punitively expensive city, where the art industry is often confused with the art world.

Lost in the Gallery-Industrial Complex>>>

Video

Beauty

A little inspiration for Sunday
(a little After Effects pin tool anyone?)

The Algorithm

The Algorithm.

By Anna Davis

via The Algorithm.

 

Pretty decent advice for young artists:

My friend the celebrated critic Shana writes from LA:

10. Remember it has nothing to do with talent.

At least not in the way we all think it should mostly. Well, sometimes it does — there are some bad artists among us, and it’s a person’s prerogative to be a bad artist if that’s what they want. But in order to persevere in this career, you must believe in yourself and your vision. When I say it’s not about talent, that’s not completely true of course – I just want you to remember that other factors — timing, personal taste, politics, economics, luck, geography, and myriad other things beyond your control — have their roles to play. Talent is not enough, you’ve got to cultivate a business sense, and cultivate patience, along with honing your craft.

http://www.rawartists.org/news/item/2265-advice-on-the-art-world-shana-nys-dambrot?fb_action_ids=10202317639998086&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_source=other_multiline&action_object_map=%5B10150861298927336%5D&action_type_map=%5B%22og.likes%22%5D&action_ref_map=%5B%5D

We must watch this at WNMU: At Berkeley

We must keep tuition down, and access up:

In its refusal to identify anyone by name or job title, this four-hour film — Mr. Wiseman’s 38th institutional documentary since 1967 — makes a profound statement about democratic participation. It’s not the “me, but the “we,” that keeps democracy alive. From the humblest janitor to the most esteemed professor, everyone belongs to the same community and is equally important. The modern university is a complex organism that, to function efficiently, needs every component, including someone to cut the grass.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/08/movies/at-berkeley-a-documentary-by-frederick-wiseman.html?src=dayp&_r=0

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